How to activate Apple ID 2fa when you have two accounts

Apple just sent this email to developers:

Two-factor authentication is an additional layer of security designed to ensure that you’re the only person who can access your account, even if someone knows your password. This significantly improves the security of your Apple ID and helps protect the photos, documents, and other data you store with Apple. For more information read Two-Factor Authentication for Apple ID.

If you didn’t enable two-factor authentication and believe someone else has access to your account, you can return to your previous security settings . This link and your Apple ID security questions will expire on February 27, 2019.

If you are like me and have a main personal account for all your Apple ID related stuff and a separate one for your work email or developer account, you are probably trying to figure out what do if said account isn’t permanently registered on any of the devices you use.

Here’s the simple work around:

  1. Set up a new user account on your Mac
  2. Login into your iCloud account tied to the developer account under the new macOS user.
  3. Activate two-factor authentication and add your preferred phone number s a backup.
  4. Verify you are able to login into your account via another device or via browser at appleid.apple.com.
  5. Logout of iCloud account on the temp macOS user and switch back to your main macOS user.
  6. Delete the temp account and now, you should be able to use the 2fa via the phone validation every time.

Hopefully Apple will soon allow dual Work/Personal accounts within a single device or iOS 13 and/or macOS 10.15. Until then, this work around should help.

Some advice from Jeff Bezos →

Jason Fried from Basecamp on advice they got from Jeff Bezos:

People who were right a lot of the time were people who often changed their minds. He doesn’t think consistency of thought is a particularly positive trait. It’s perfectly healthy — encouraged, even — to have an idea tomorrow that contradicted your idea today.

Permalink

The Oldest Airlines in the World That Are Still Flying Today →

It might surprise some to learn that the world’s second-oldest airline is actually Colombia’s Avianca. It was founded as SCADTA, or Sociedad Colombo Alemana de Transporte Aéreo and its first flight was from Barranquilla to Puerto Berrio in September 1920. The airline changed its name to Avianca – an acronym of Aerovías Nacionales de Colombia – in 1940 when it merged with another acronymized airline named SACO (Servicio Aéreo Colombiano) and its German backers were forced to divest due to World War II. Avianca now includes subsidiaries in several Latin American countries and merged with the Salvadoran carrier TACA, which itself was founded in 1931, in 2009. The combined airline became a member of the Star Alliance in 2012.

Permalink

T-Mobile Tackles Customer-Service Woes by Adding a Human Touch →

Bloomberg:

The third-largest U.S. wireless carrier unveiled what it claims is a patented customer-service program on Wednesday called Team of Experts. Subscribers who call or message for assistance will be assigned a group of employees to fix the issue.

This might sound like a corporate joke, but the few times I’ve had to interact with T-Mobile support has been via iMessage for business or their in app chat. My experience has been incredible so far.

For now, no matter how good your AI or chatbot is, a well trained human with full authority to get stuff done for you, will outperform any tech out there. Glad they are investing in customer support as a differentiatior.Permalink